#Thinkwing: Mon, 9/18/2017, 9PM @KPFTHouston 90.1FM. TOPICS: FEMA – What you need to know now and in the future. GUEST: PETER HERRICK, Jr. is communications specialist for FEMA [AUDIO/VIDEO]

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Thinkwing Radio with Mike Honig (@ThinkwingRadio), a listener call-in show  airing live every Monday night from 9-10 PM (CT) on KPFT-FM 90.1 (Houston). My engineer is Bob Gartner.

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TOPICS:  SUPPORT KPFT!  FEMA: What you need to know now and in the future.

(Part 2 of the Flood Control discussion is now tentatively scheduled for September 25th)

GUEST:   PETER HERRICK, Jr. is communications specialist for FEMA in Washington, DC. Mr. Herrick is out front for the agency in times of disaster, serving as an Agency spokesman and the External Affairs Officer on a response team. </spanHe has responded to recent disasters such as the West Virginia chemical spill, Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Irene, and Tropical Storm Lee. He has also worked on high profile topics such as the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station biennial exercise and the 2015 Papal Visit.

For the purposes of this show, I operate on two mottoes:

  • You’re entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts;
    Houston Mayor Annise Parker [L] with Mike, just before the show. (Dec. 14, 2015)

    Houston Mayor Annise Parker [L] with Mike, just before the show. (Dec. 7, 2015)

  • An educated electorate is a prerequisite for a democracy.

SIGNOFF QUOTE[s]:

“Insurance is just another way of saying, ‘We’re all in this together.’” ~ Michael R Honig, 9/17/2017  

You can call FEMA 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. (ET), 7 days a week:

6 a.m. to 10 p.m. (CT), 7 days a week:

1-800-621-FEMA (1-800-621-3362)

TTY 1-800-462-7585

 DIAL 711 TO Access VRS (Video Relay Service)

You can also send an email from the Disaster Assistance webform.

Or write to: FEMA P.O. Box 10055 Hyattsville, MD 20782-8055

 Possible discussion points with links:

  1. Register for FEMA Assistance! Don’t disqualify yourself!
    1. FEMA can provide assistance for temporary housing, housing repair, vehicle damage, property damage (clothing, furniture, utilities, etc.).
  2. FEMA is only part of the recovery process.
    1. Insurance, and possibly an SBA loan are two other large parts.
    2. FEMA functions as roughly the equivalent of secondary insurance and does not duplicate anything insurance has covered.
    3. Max per person $33,300
  3. Don’t wait to clean up and make repairs to your flood-damaged home.
    1. After you apply for FEMA assistance, an inspector will contact you to make an appointment to view disaster damage or photos of damage. Ask to see photo ID. Inspections are free.
  4. Donate wisely to help survivors!
    1. Make cash donations to trusted organizations. Visit the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD.org) for a listed of trusted organizations.
  5. Stay in touch with FEMA and the SBA: Homeowners, renters and business owners may visit one of the Disaster Recovery Centers serving survivors in hard-hit areas. At the center, you can apply for a FEMA grant, get help completing a disaster loan application, submit missing documentation or update your contact information.
  6. For possible additional info: Links to a Facebook Live done by Mr. Herrick. “…there may be some good topics in the questions. Though there’s also some not-so-nice stuff in there as well. I’m happy to cover anything in there, even the conspiracy theories.”

INTRO (Segment #1): “WATCH LIVE: Navigating the FEMA process is a challenge, especially for people concerned about their immigration status. We have experts from FEMA and the director of the Mexico Center at Baker Institute here to answer your questions.

https://www.facebook.com/abc13Houston/videos/10155342541169342/

INTRO (Segment#2) : “WATCH LIVE: Navigating the FEMA process is a challenge, especially for people concerned about their immigration status. We have experts from FEMA and the director of the Mexico Center at Baker Institute here to answer your questions.”

https://www.facebook.com/abc13Houston/videos/10155342291844342/

TOPICS FROM PREVIOUS WEEKS:

Is It Time for the U.S. to Rein in the Presidency? Two historians consider whether it’s time to raise the possibility of decentralization amid frustrations with the federal government. By Julian E. Zelizer and Morton Keller [Theatlantic.Com] Jun 9, 2017

ALEC’s Application for a Convention of the States under Article V of the Constitution of the United States

Article V, U.S. Constitution (The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)

  1. The Congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three fourths of the several states, or by conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; provided that no amendment which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first article; and that no state, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate.

FREE SPEECH: What’s constitutionally guaranteed and what’s culturally expected

  1. 1st Amendment:  First Amendment | Constitution | US Law | LII / Legal Information Institute: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
  2. The Amendment protects us against Government interference in speech, press and religion.
  3. NON-government interference – private businesses, publishers. Etc. – is more culturally entrenched but usually not illegal.
    1. The Amendment protects us against Government interference in speech, press and religion.
    2. NON-government interference – private businesses, publishers. Etc. – is more culturally entrenched but usually not illegal.A Civics discussion:
      1. Our founders did not design our government to be “efficient”. They designed it to be “safe”.
      2. People who say that they want government to run like a business miss the point: Government is NOT a business.
      3. People who say that they want government to run like a household miss the point: Government is NOT a household.
      4. Government is a Sovereign, which is an entirely different and unique thing, totally unlike a business or a household.
      5. No one branch of government is meant to be ‘supreme’. The 3 branches of government – executive, legislative and judicial – were designed to be co-equal.
      6. The tug-of-war that goes on among them – this inefficient, tug-of-war that goes on among them – is designed to slow things down, and make them “safe” but “inefficient’.
      7. In today’s terminology, the inefficiency designed into our government is not a “bug”. It’s a “feature”.
      8. I’ve said for many years that people who have run big businesses should not be politicians, and certainly should not be president. If there was ever an example of why I believe that, it’s Trump.
      9. We are now experiencing the wisdom of that “feature”, as the Trump regime attempts to establish its Supremacy over the other branches.

NATO – Topic: Collective defence – Article 5

  1. Highlights
    1.  Collective defence means that an attack against one Ally is considered as an attack against all Allies.
    2. The principle of collective defence is enshrined in Article 5 of the Washington Treaty.
    3. NATO invoked Article 5 for the first time in its history after the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States.
    4. NATO has taken collective defence measures on several occasions, for instance in response to the situation in Syria and in the wake of the Russia-Ukraine crisis.
    5. NATO has standing forces on active duty that contribute to the Alliance’s collective defence efforts on a permanent basis.
  2. TEXT: NATO  Article 5
    1. “The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective self-defence recognized by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, will assist the Party or Parties so attacked by taking forthwith, individually and in concert with the other Parties, such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed force, to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area.
    2. ii) Any such armed attack and all measures taken as a result thereof shall immediately be reported to the Security Council. Such measures shall be terminated when the Security Council has taken the measures necessary to restore and maintain international peace and security.” “The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective self-defence recognized by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, will assist the Party or Parties so attacked by taking forthwith, individually and in concert with the other Parties, such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed force, to restore and maintain the security of the North Atlantic area.
    3. Any such armed attack and all measures taken as a result thereof shall immediately be reported to the Security Council. Such measures shall be terminated when the Security Council has taken the measures necessary to restore and maintain international peace and security.”

LINKS:

  • Emoluments Clause of the Constitution (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia):
    1. The Ineligibility Clause, one of the two clauses often called the Emoluments Clause,[1][2] and sometimes also referred to as the Incompatibility Clause[3] or the Sinecure Clause,[4] is found in Article 1, Section 6, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution. It places limitations upon the employment of members of Congress and prohibits employees of the Executive Branch from serving in Congress during their terms in office. The name “Ineligibility Clause” is only used by a minority of writers, as compared to the name “Emoluments Clause”.[1][2][5]
    2. The clause states: No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office.”
  • Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

The Twenty-fifth Amendment (Amendment XXV) to the United States Constitution deals with succession to the Presidency and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, as well as responding to Presidential disabilities. It supersedes the ambiguous wording of Article II, Section 1, Clause 6 of the Constitution, which does not expressly state whether the Vice President becomes the President or Acting President if the President dies, resigns, is removed from office or is otherwise unable to discharge the powers of the presidency.[1] The Twenty-fifth Amendment was adopted on February 10, 1967.[2]

    1. Section 1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.
    2. Section 2. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.
    3. Section 3. Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.
    4. Section 4. Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.
    5. Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office.[3]
  • Group will sue Trump over business’ foreign profits, By Cyra Master 2 hrs ago (The Hill) 1/22/2017 via MSN
    1. The Title of Nobility Clause [Also known as the Emoluments Clause] is a provision in Article I, Section 9, Clause 8 of the United States Constitution, that prohibits the federal government from granting titles of nobility, and restricts members of the government from receiving gifts, emoluments, offices or titles from foreign states without the consent of the United States Congress. Also known as the Emoluments Clause, it was designed to shield the republican character of the United States against so–called “corrupting foreign influences”. This shield is reinforced by the corresponding prohibition on state titles of nobility in Article I, Section 10, and more generally by the Republican Guarantee Clause in Article IV, Section[2] ~ Title of Nobility Clause – Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Title_of_Nobility_Clause

 SOURCES WHICH MAY BE RELEVANT TO OTHER DISCUSSION:

======================================================

  1. Trial Balloon for a Coup? Analyzing the news of the past 24 hours, by Yonatan Zunger
  2. Four Freedoms, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: The Four Freedoms were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on January 6, 1941. In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people “everywhere in the world” ought to enjoy:
    1. Freedom of speech
    2. Freedom of worship
    3. Freedom from want
    4. Freedom from fear
    5. Roosevelt delivered his speech 11 months before the United States declared war on Japan, December 8, 1941. The State of the Union speech before Congress was largely about the national security of the United States and the threat to other democracies from world war that was being waged across the continents in the eastern hemisphere. In the speech, he made a break with the tradition of United States non-interventionism that had long been held in the United States. He outlined the U.S. role in helping allies already engaged in warfare.
  • Differences between Liberals, Conservatives, Libertarians and neo-Conservatives

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